stuff I read · Reading Graphically

Marvel Rising (Marvel Rising #0-4) by Devin Grayson, Ryan North, and G. Willow Wilson with illustration by Helen Chen, Marco Failla, Gurihiru, and Georges Duarte

39324060Summary from Goodreads:
SQUIRREL GIRL meets MS. MARVEL – for the very first time! When Doreen Green (also known as the Unbeatable Squirrel Girl) volunteers as head counselor for an extracurricular computer programming class, little does she know that junior counselor Kamala Khan moonlights as crime fighting super hero Ms. Marvel! But this coding configuration is more than just ones and zeros when a mysterious new super villain shows her face! Will our heroes be able to save the day without blowing their secret identities? Join Ms. Marvel and Squirrel Girl (with some special guest appearances) as they learn what it truly takes to become the next generation of Marvel heroes!
Collects Marvel Rising #0, Marvel Rising: Alpha, Marvel Rising: Squirrel Girl/Ms. Marvel, Marvel Rising: Ms. Marvel/Squirrel Girl And Marvel Rising: Omega.

I need to make a dent in my comics backlog so I picked up my Marvel Rising issues during the 24in48 Readathon. Now, this is a really cute comic, and we finally got to see a Ms. Marvel/Squirrel Girl team-up (with additional guest appearances from some of Squirrel Girl’s regulars) but it just wasn’t as good as I wanted it to be. First of all, the way Marvel marketed this as a bunch of #1s made it almost impossible for my LCS to get it on my pull list (the freebie #0 wasn’t even in their assortment for FCBD) and second, the storyline was too much, almost like they tried to compress an entire Moon Girl-like new Inhuman story into this run PLUS the team-up. It didn’t do justice to either story. Cute, but it could have been better. Especially since the best part was when Kamala/Ms. Marvel and Dorren/Squirrel Girl each determined that the other was a superhero and then worried if the other girl had figured it out, too! I do hope they give this team-up another try.

Dear FTC: I bought all my issues from my LCS or Midtown Comics.

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Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Abbott, written by Saladin Ahmed and illustrated by Sami Kivelä

38748572Summary from Goodreads:
While investigating police brutality and corruption in 1970s Detroit, journalist Elena Abbott uncovers supernatural forces being controlled by a secret society of the city’s elite.

In the uncertain social and political climate of 1972 Detroit, hard-nosed, chain-smoking tabloid reporter Elena Abbott investigates a series of grisly crimes that the police have ignored. Crimes she knows to be the work of dark occult forces. Forces that took her husband from her. Forces she has sworn to destroy.

Hugo Award-nominated novelist Saladin Ahmed (Star Wars: Canto Bight, Black Bolt) and artist Sami Kivelä (Beautiful Canvas) present one woman’s search for the truth that destroyed her family amidst an exploration of the systemic societal constructs that haunt our country to this day.

From my first round of Pigeon/TBR recs from Book Riot (thanks, Mya!).

Abbott is an immersive, one-two punch from Saladin Ahmed on story and Sami Kivelä on art that explores the racial politics of 1970s Detroit while also giving us a supernatural-horror plot. Elena Abbot as tough investigative journalist is a smashing lead character. Kivelä’s artwork is AMAZING, the colors, the combination of gritty realism and really trippy, psychedelic fantasy art was stellar (it’s a bit gory, though, so if you’re not into that then you might want to skip this one). The story hinted at some excellent backstory for Abbott that I hope Ahmed gets a chance to explore in future arcs.

Dear FTC: I bought a copy of this book after it was recommended to me through a paid program.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Girl Town by Carolyn Nowak

38469986Summary from Goodreads:
Multi-award-winning cartoonist Carolyn Nowak (Lumberjanes) finds powerful truths in fantasy worlds. Her stunning solo debut collection celebrates the ascent of a rising star in comics.

Diana got hurt—a lot—and she’s decided to deal with this fact by purchasing a life-sized robot boyfriend. Mary and La-La host a podcast about a movie no one’s ever seen. Kelly has dragged her friend Beth out of her comfort zone—and into a day at the fantasy market that neither of them will forget.

Carolyn Nowak’s Girl Town collects the Ignatz Award-winning stories “Radishes” and “Diana’s Electric Tongue” together with several other tales of young adulthood and the search for connection. Here are her most acclaimed mini-comics and anthology contributions, enhanced with new colors and joined by brand-new work.

Bold, infatuated, wounded, or lost, Nowak’s girls shine with life and longing. Their stories—depicted with remarkable charm and insight—capture the spirit of our time.

Girl Town came across my radar as part of my second round of TBR (aka Pigeon) recommendations. (Thanks, Mya!) So I was reeeeeealy smart and got the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store to pick Girl Town for our December selection.

Ultimately, I liked this collection. I think Carolyn Nowak does great work with Lumberjanes, so I’m glad I read her own work in Girl Town. I really liked the two center stories, “Radishes” (about two young women at a fantasy-ish boardwalk market) and “Diana’s Electric Tongue” (about a woman who is fed up with dating and purchases a robot boyfriend). The other stories felt a bit unfinished in places, not necessarily because they all end abruptly, and one is a transfictional piece that incorporated multimedia-like panels surrounded by a lot of dialogue ballons and it was very hard to read. This is definitely a collection that fits in with Kelly Link, Sofia Samatar, Carmen Maria Machado, and Anjali Sachdeva, only sequential art instead of prose. If you’re a fan of those authors, I think you’ll like Nowak’s work.

Dear FTC: I bought a copy of this book after receiving the recommendation in my Pigeon.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel adapted by Fred Fordham

38359009Summary from Goodreads:
A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer-prize winning American classic.

“Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement.

Now, this most beloved and acclaimed novel is reborn for a new age as a gorgeous graphic novel. Scout, Gem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch, and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in vivid and moving illustrations by artist Fred Fordham.

Enduring in vision, Harper Lee’s timeless novel illuminate the complexities of human nature and the depths of the human heart with humor, unwavering honesty, and a tender, nostalgic beauty. Lifetime admirers and new readers alike will be touched by this special visual edition that joins the ranks of the graphic novel adaptations of A Wrinkle in Time and The Alchemist.

img_0422Fred Fordham has created a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. The colors and art are best when it’s not dark (i.e. the nighttime scenes when the children are sneaking around the Radleys’ house). I snagged a screenshot of part of the page where Jem, Scout, and Dill have met and colors really do pop in the daytime scenes. There are also some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the To Kill a Mockingbird movie, like the “mad dog” scene.

What I found missing was all the “local color” that comes through in Scout’s internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it’s not cut entirely. For instance, the entire sequence at the end of the book with the pageant (Scout dressed as as ham) and the scary walk home when the children are attacked feel flat. There is so much that Scout thinks about during the pageant, all her funny little-girl thoughts, and then the walk home is much scarier when Scout can only describe the muffled sounds she hears as opposed to several blurry panels.

Definitely worth a read if you are a graphic novel and To Kill a Mockingbird fan.

Dear FTC: I had a paper galley of this book then switched to the digital galley since that was in color and definitely easier to read.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Pretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The Shrike by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Ríos (Pretty Deadly #1-5)

Summary from Goodreads:20638291
KELLY SUE DeCONNICK (Avengers Assemble, Captain Marvel) and EMMA RÍOS (Dr. Strange, Osborn) present the collected opening arc of their surprise-hit series that marries the magical realism of Sandman with the western brutality of Preacher. Death’s daughter rides the wind on a horse made of smoke and her face bears the skull marks of her father. Her origin story is a tale of retribution as beautifully lush as it is unflinchingly savage.

Collects PRETTY DEADLY #1-5

I’m a bit late to the Pretty Deadly party, but I knocked off another Read Harder challenge task – this is western but crossed with some serious high fantasy. Deconnick drops you right into the middle of the story and keeps her foot on the gas. Loved the frame story of Bunny and Butterfly. I liked most of the art except some pages felt like a linking panel was missing or that I wasn’t quite sure what order I should use to read them.

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book a while ago.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Heavy Vinyl, Vol. 1 by Carly Usdin and Nina Vakueva (Hi-Fi Fight Club #1)

35606614Summary from Goodreads:
When Chris joins the staff at her local record store, she’s surprised to find out that her co-workers share a secret: they’re all members of a secret fight club that take on the patriarchy and fight crime!

Starry-eyed Chris has just started the dream job every outcast kid in town wants: working at Vinyl Mayhem. It’s as rad as she imagined; her boss is BOSS, her co-workers spend their time arguing over music, pushing against the patriarchy, and endlessly trying to form a band. When Rosie Riot, the staff’s favorite singer, mysteriously vanishes the night before her band’s show, Chris discovers her co-workers are doing more than just sorting vinyl . . . Her local indie record store is also a front for a teen girl vigilante fight club!

Follow writer Carly Usdin (director of Suicide Kale) and artist Nina Vakueva (Lilith’s World) into the Hi-Fi Fight Club, where they deliver a rock and roll tale of intrigue and boundless friendship.

Fight Club + Josie and the Pussycats + Empire Records (so many jokes) + all-lady crew = excellent.

I can haz moar plz? (I mean, I don’t have much more to say. It was really cute.)

Read for the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store.

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol

35998933Summary from Goodreads:
A gripping and hilarious middle-grade summer camp memoir from the author of Anya’s Ghost.

All Vera wants to do is fit in—but that’s not easy for a Russian girl in the suburbs. Her friends live in fancy houses and their parents can afford to send them to the best summer camps. Vera’s single mother can’t afford that sort of luxury, but there’s one summer camp in her price range—Russian summer camp.

Vera is sure she’s found the one place she can fit in, but camp is far from what she imagined. And nothing could prepare her for all the “cool girl” drama, endless Russian history lessons, and outhouses straight out of nightmares!

Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier, Cece Bell, and Victoria Jamieson, Vera Brosgol’s Be Prepared is a funny and relatable middle-grade graphic novel about navigating your own culture, struggling to belong, and the value of true friendship.

Be Prepared is a very sweet autobiographical graphic novel about an immigrant girl who wants nothing more than to go to sleep-away summer camp like her more privileged friends. And when she finds a way go, which is Russian camp partially subsidized by the Orthodox Church, it turns out that sleep-away camp – in the woods, with no running water – is perhaps not all that it’s purported to be. Loved the art style and minimal color palette.

Read for the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store.

Dear FTC: I purchased my copy of this book.

mini-review · Reading Diversely · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang

34506912Summary from Goodreads:
Paris, at the dawn of the modern age:

Prince Sebastian is looking for a bride―or rather, his parents are looking for one for him. Sebastian is too busy hiding his secret life from everyone. At night he puts on daring dresses and takes Paris by storm as the fabulous Lady Crystallia―the hottest fashion icon in the world capital of fashion!

Sebastian’s secret weapon (and best friend) is the brilliant dressmaker Frances―one of only two people who know the truth: sometimes this boy wears dresses. But Frances dreams of greatness, and being someone’s secret weapon means being a secret. Forever. How long can Frances defer her dreams to protect a friend? Jen Wang weaves an exuberantly romantic tale of identity, young love, art, and family. A fairy tale for any age, The Prince and the Dressmaker will steal your heart.

Do you want a beautifully drawn original graphic novel about a teenage prince in Belle Époque-esque France who secretly does drag and the dressmaker he finds to both dress him and keep his secret? Oh, you do.

The Prince and the Dressmaker written and illustrated by Jen Wang is gorgeous novel about identity and friendship and dreams. Sebastian and Frances are such wonderful characters, one trapped by gender expression and the other by class, and their story is so sweet. I love how Wang explores artistic expression and gendered clothing style. I feel like she’s noodling with the concept that what clothing one puts on one’s body is separate from one’s sexual orientation or gender. The reader is never shown WHO Sebastian is attracted to – whether men or women or both (or neither, since he’s only sixteen) – or if he doesn’t identify as male or is genderfluid. In the space of this book, Sebastian just loves to wear beautiful clothes and Frances is the one who can make them. In my opinion, the Lady Crystallia persona is really only used when Sebastian is hiding that portion of himself; once his secret is discovered, the persona is no longer necessary for him to dress in drag (FYI, there is a very cruel “outing” scene). I really like how Wang left the specifics unfinished and fluid. Fluidity in gender identity or expression still isn’t often found on the shelves. The art is lovely – fashionistas should be very, very jealous that these gowns do not exist for real.

The Prince and the Dressmaker is out now!

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book since I wasn’t cool enough to get a galley.