mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel adapted by Fred Fordham

38359009Summary from Goodreads:
A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer-prize winning American classic.

“Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement.

Now, this most beloved and acclaimed novel is reborn for a new age as a gorgeous graphic novel. Scout, Gem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch, and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in vivid and moving illustrations by artist Fred Fordham.

Enduring in vision, Harper Lee’s timeless novel illuminate the complexities of human nature and the depths of the human heart with humor, unwavering honesty, and a tender, nostalgic beauty. Lifetime admirers and new readers alike will be touched by this special visual edition that joins the ranks of the graphic novel adaptations of A Wrinkle in Time and The Alchemist.

img_0422Fred Fordham has created a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. The colors and art are best when it’s not dark (i.e. the nighttime scenes when the children are sneaking around the Radleys’ house). I snagged a screenshot of part of the page where Jem, Scout, and Dill have met and colors really do pop in the daytime scenes. There are also some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the To Kill a Mockingbird movie, like the “mad dog” scene.

What I found missing was all the “local color” that comes through in Scout’s internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it’s not cut entirely. For instance, the entire sequence at the end of the book with the pageant (Scout dressed as as ham) and the scary walk home when the children are attacked feel flat. There is so much that Scout thinks about during the pageant, all her funny little-girl thoughts, and then the walk home is much scarier when Scout can only describe the muffled sounds she hears as opposed to several blurry panels.

Definitely worth a read if you are a graphic novel and To Kill a Mockingbird fan.

Dear FTC: I had a paper galley of this book then switched to the digital galley since that was in color and definitely easier to read.

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mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Pretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The Shrike by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Ríos (Pretty Deadly #1-5)

Summary from Goodreads:20638291
KELLY SUE DeCONNICK (Avengers Assemble, Captain Marvel) and EMMA RÍOS (Dr. Strange, Osborn) present the collected opening arc of their surprise-hit series that marries the magical realism of Sandman with the western brutality of Preacher. Death’s daughter rides the wind on a horse made of smoke and her face bears the skull marks of her father. Her origin story is a tale of retribution as beautifully lush as it is unflinchingly savage.

Collects PRETTY DEADLY #1-5

I’m a bit late to the Pretty Deadly party, but I knocked off another Read Harder challenge task – this is western but crossed with some serious high fantasy. Deconnick drops you right into the middle of the story and keeps her foot on the gas. Loved the frame story of Bunny and Butterfly. I liked most of the art except some pages felt like a linking panel was missing or that I wasn’t quite sure what order I should use to read them.

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book a while ago.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Heavy Vinyl, Vol. 1 by Carly Usdin and Nina Vakueva (Hi-Fi Fight Club #1)

35606614Summary from Goodreads:
When Chris joins the staff at her local record store, she’s surprised to find out that her co-workers share a secret: they’re all members of a secret fight club that take on the patriarchy and fight crime!

Starry-eyed Chris has just started the dream job every outcast kid in town wants: working at Vinyl Mayhem. It’s as rad as she imagined; her boss is BOSS, her co-workers spend their time arguing over music, pushing against the patriarchy, and endlessly trying to form a band. When Rosie Riot, the staff’s favorite singer, mysteriously vanishes the night before her band’s show, Chris discovers her co-workers are doing more than just sorting vinyl . . . Her local indie record store is also a front for a teen girl vigilante fight club!

Follow writer Carly Usdin (director of Suicide Kale) and artist Nina Vakueva (Lilith’s World) into the Hi-Fi Fight Club, where they deliver a rock and roll tale of intrigue and boundless friendship.

Fight Club + Josie and the Pussycats + Empire Records (so many jokes) + all-lady crew = excellent.

I can haz moar plz? (I mean, I don’t have much more to say. It was really cute.)

Read for the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store.

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book.

mini-review · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol

35998933Summary from Goodreads:
A gripping and hilarious middle-grade summer camp memoir from the author of Anya’s Ghost.

All Vera wants to do is fit in—but that’s not easy for a Russian girl in the suburbs. Her friends live in fancy houses and their parents can afford to send them to the best summer camps. Vera’s single mother can’t afford that sort of luxury, but there’s one summer camp in her price range—Russian summer camp.

Vera is sure she’s found the one place she can fit in, but camp is far from what she imagined. And nothing could prepare her for all the “cool girl” drama, endless Russian history lessons, and outhouses straight out of nightmares!

Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier, Cece Bell, and Victoria Jamieson, Vera Brosgol’s Be Prepared is a funny and relatable middle-grade graphic novel about navigating your own culture, struggling to belong, and the value of true friendship.

Be Prepared is a very sweet autobiographical graphic novel about an immigrant girl who wants nothing more than to go to sleep-away summer camp like her more privileged friends. And when she finds a way go, which is Russian camp partially subsidized by the Orthodox Church, it turns out that sleep-away camp – in the woods, with no running water – is perhaps not all that it’s purported to be. Loved the art style and minimal color palette.

Read for the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store.

Dear FTC: I purchased my copy of this book.

mini-review · Reading Diversely · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang

34506912Summary from Goodreads:
Paris, at the dawn of the modern age:

Prince Sebastian is looking for a bride―or rather, his parents are looking for one for him. Sebastian is too busy hiding his secret life from everyone. At night he puts on daring dresses and takes Paris by storm as the fabulous Lady Crystallia―the hottest fashion icon in the world capital of fashion!

Sebastian’s secret weapon (and best friend) is the brilliant dressmaker Frances―one of only two people who know the truth: sometimes this boy wears dresses. But Frances dreams of greatness, and being someone’s secret weapon means being a secret. Forever. How long can Frances defer her dreams to protect a friend? Jen Wang weaves an exuberantly romantic tale of identity, young love, art, and family. A fairy tale for any age, The Prince and the Dressmaker will steal your heart.

Do you want a beautifully drawn original graphic novel about a teenage prince in Belle Époque-esque France who secretly does drag and the dressmaker he finds to both dress him and keep his secret? Oh, you do.

The Prince and the Dressmaker written and illustrated by Jen Wang is gorgeous novel about identity and friendship and dreams. Sebastian and Frances are such wonderful characters, one trapped by gender expression and the other by class, and their story is so sweet. I love how Wang explores artistic expression and gendered clothing style. I feel like she’s noodling with the concept that what clothing one puts on one’s body is separate from one’s sexual orientation or gender. The reader is never shown WHO Sebastian is attracted to – whether men or women or both (or neither, since he’s only sixteen) – or if he doesn’t identify as male or is genderfluid. In the space of this book, Sebastian just loves to wear beautiful clothes and Frances is the one who can make them. In my opinion, the Lady Crystallia persona is really only used when Sebastian is hiding that portion of himself; once his secret is discovered, the persona is no longer necessary for him to dress in drag (FYI, there is a very cruel “outing” scene). I really like how Wang left the specifics unfinished and fluid. Fluidity in gender identity or expression still isn’t often found on the shelves. The art is lovely – fashionistas should be very, very jealous that these gowns do not exist for real.

The Prince and the Dressmaker is out now!

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book since I wasn’t cool enough to get a galley.

mini-review · Read Harder · Read My Own Damn Books · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Ladycastle, written by Delilah S. Dawon, illustrated by Ashley A. Woods and Becca Farrow

34466854Summary from Goodreads:
When the King and all the men of the castle die, it’s time for the women to knight up.

When King Mancastle and his mighty vassals ride off on a crusade, the women left behind are not at all put out—that’s a lot less armor polishing to do. Of course, when the men get themselves eaten by a dragon and leave a curse that attracts monsters to the castle . . . well, the women take umbrage with that.

Now, Merinor, the blacksmith’s wife is King, Princess Aeve is the Captain, and the only remaining (and least capable) knight, Sir Riddick, is tasked with teaching the ladies of the castle how to fight, defend, build, and do all manner of noisy things the men had done while the women assumed they were just drunk.

Novelist Delilah S. Dawson (Star Wars: The Perfect Weapon, As Wicked as She Wants) brings her first original series to the graphic novel world, and is joined by breakthrough illustrator Ashley A. Woods (Niobe: She Is Life) for a rollicking fantasy adventure in Ladycastle.

What do all the women of Mancastle do when all the terrible dudes they are married to/related to go off and get themselves eaten by a dragon and the castle cursed by a wizard? They do all the stuff the men were doing – but better, with more cooperation and much less violence. (The only dude left is the most inept knight who looks like the Santa Claus version of King Pellinore.) They take advice from a Lady in the Pond who dispenses swords, the Well-Hag Hagatha, and a badass castle librarian in a wheelchair to fight off salamanders, werewolves, harpies, and a surprising Big Bad. And they re-name the castle Ladycastle.

I really enjoyed this funny, rompy take on Arthurian legend-ish tales. There were a lot of riffs on Disney movies, musicals, and Monty Python jokes. The writing does hit you over the head with very obvious criticisms of gender norms/stereotypes, compulsory heterosexuality (maybe?, no one seemed to be in a happy heterosexual marriage but no one was in a non-hetero relationship, either, and no one was exactly bemoaning having no dudes around for sexytimes; it wouldn’t have hurt to put an explicitly non-heterosexual partnership or actual genderqueer character on the page rather than some implied coding), and toxic masculinity (all the dudes these women were related to or married to were the actual worst). But sometimes we need the blindingly obvious, though. I very much enjoyed reading Ladycastle and the art was excellent, very straightforward. This is an all-ages comic, not a whole lot of violence, no language or sex.

Dear FTC: I bought my copy of this book to read for the Graphic Novel Book Group at my store. It fulfilled the “read a comic from a publisher other than DC, Marvel, or Image” task for Read Harder.

mini-review · Read My Own Damn Books · Reading Graphically · stuff I read

Cairo by G. Willow Wilson

4907450Summary from Goodreads:
The original graphic novel by breakout talent G. Willow Wilson, a Cairo-based journalist, with art by renowned illustrator M.K. Perker, is now available in trade paperback! The creative team behind the new monthly series AIR brings together ancient and modern Middle East with a Vertigo twist. A stolen hookah, a spiritual underworld and a genie on the run change the lives of five strangers forever in this modern fable set on the streets of the Middle East’s largest metropolis.

This magical-realism thriller interweaves the fates of a drug runner, a down-on-his-luck journalist, an American expatriate, a young activist and an Israeli soldier as they race through bustling present-day Cairo to find an artifact of unimaginable power, one protected by a dignified jinn and sought by a wrathful gangster-magician. But the vastness of Africa’s legendary City of Victory extends into a spiritual realm – the Undernile – and even darker powers lurk there…

Don’t miss the incredible graphic novel Publishers Weekly called “lush and energetic…a beautiful book,” and The Los Angeles Times Book Review praised as “lyrically beautiful.”

What do you get when you mix a hash smuggler, a lost Israeli soldier, a Cairene journalist, a Lebanese-American man with secrets, an idealistic California Girl, and a jinn? A bananas graphic novel about choice and sacrifice. I was a little worried going in that I wouldn’t like it because I love Ms Marvel so much, but this has the same quippy, dry humor. It’s definitely for adults – there’s a lot more violence and magic than Ms. Marvel. Good art, but I wish it had been in color.

I picked this up during Willow’s signing when she was in town this year and got it signed.

Dear FTC: I read My Own Damn copy.