Austenesque · mini-review · stuff I read

Ordinary, Extraordinary Jane Austen by Deborah Hopkinson

34972694Summary from Goodreads:
It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen is one of our greatest writers.

But before that, she was just an ordinary girl.

In fact, young Jane was a bit quiet and shy; if you had met her back then, you might not have noticed her at all. But she would have noticed you. Jane watched and listened to all the things people around her did and said and locked those observations away for safekeeping.

Jane also loved to read. She devoured everything in her father’s massive library, and before long she began creating her own stories. In her time, the most popular books were grand adventures and romances, but Jane wanted to go her own way . . . and went on to invent an entirely new kind of novel.

Deborah Hopkinson and Qin Leng have collaborated on a gorgeous tribute to an independent thinker who turned ordinary life into extraordinary stories and created a body of work that has delighted and inspired readers for generations.

I did not now how badly I wanted an adorable children’s picture book biography of Jane Austen until someone wrote an adorable children’s picture book biography of Jane Austen.

img_9325Ordinary, Extraordinary Jane Austen is a beautiful book illustrated by Qin Leng’s delicate artwork.  Look at little tiny Jane and her bookstack! Ahhhhh! (Yes, yes, the clothing styles aren’t quite right for Austen’s childhood, but it’s too, too cute. RIP me.) There’s a lot of girl power and reading all the books you want overlaid over the basic timeline of Austen’s life. Being a picture book, it doesn’t get very in-depth as a biography but I think it’s just right. Definitely a book to pick up for Janeites of all ages.

Ordinary, Extraordinary Jane Austen is out tomorrow from Balzer + Bray.

Dear FTC: A fellow bookseller got me this picture book galley and it is the CUTEST thing ever. (Camille!!!! You are the best xoxo)

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mini-review · stuff I read

A Secret Sisterhood: The Literary Friendships of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf by Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney

33413920Summary from Goodreads:
Male literary friendships are the stuff of legend; think Byron and Shelley, Fitzgerald and Hemingway. But the world’s best-loved female authors are usually mythologized as solitary eccentrics or isolated geniuses. Coauthors and real-life friends Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney prove this wrong, thanks to their discovery of a wealth of surprising collaborations: the friendship between Jane Austen and one of the family servants, playwright Anne Sharp; the daring feminist author Mary Taylor, who shaped the work of Charlotte Brontë; the transatlantic friendship of the seemingly aloof George Eliot and Harriet Beecher Stowe; and Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield, most often portrayed as bitter foes, but who, in fact, enjoyed a complex friendship fired by an underlying erotic charge.

Through letters and diaries that have never been published before, A Secret Sisterhood resurrects these forgotten stories of female friendships. They were sometimes scandalous and volatile, sometimes supportive and inspiring, but always—until now—tantalizingly consigned to the shadows.

A Secret Sisterhood is a set of four short biographies about a specific female, literary friendship in the lives of Britain’s four greatest female writers: Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. (George Eliot and Harriet Beecher Stowe were besties, yo #goals.)

I really, really want to like this book more than I do. I like the concept of this book – reconstructing the literary friendships of major 19th century/early 20th English lady writers is something I will always be down for – but I feel the construction of the book brings it down. The authors try to walk a line between straight literary biography and historical fiction. There are imagined scenes of the women’s lives interspersed with sentences drawn from letters and diaries and that juxtaposition almost never works for me. I would have preferred a much more straightforward literary biography, personally, with longer quotes from the primary source material. Also some notation/citations in the text would have been nice (I had a digital galley that appeared very close to the finished product without notation so perhaps the finished copies have that.)

A Secret Sisterhood is out next week, October 17, in the US if you want to check it out.

Dear FTC: I read a digital galley from the publisher via Edelweiss.