stuff I read

Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick by Maya Dusenbery

30653955Summary from Goodreads:
In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how gender bias infects every level of medicine and healthcare today—leading to inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment that threatens women’s lives and well-being.

Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with experts within and outside the medical establishment, and personal stories from regular women to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today. In addition to offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its effects, she suggests concrete steps we can take to cure it.

As an epidemiologist, one of the first things I learned when starting data analysis was that you always included age (either categorical or a mean and range) and gender in your Table 1, usually in the first two lines. Apparently, Dr. Torner’s list of “best practices” for data analysis is an anomaly. Including gender in one’s analysis or report of results in the medical literature is often ignored. The problem with ignoring gender runs deep into scientific research, from subject recruitment for clinical trials all the way back to the gender of laboratory animals in bench research.

Doing Harm is a deep-dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women and minorities from the word go. Results from huge clinical trials that enrolled only men (for a really stupid reason) are used in evidence-based medicine and applied across all genders. Laboratory phase-one pharmacology trials using only male animals fail to reveal that a female-based biochemistry will metabolize the drug differently. The imbalance spirals outward into the patient experience. Misogynistic, prejudicial, and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers are reported through interviews and research reported in the medical literature. There is a persistent and pervasive belief that self-reported symptoms by women and people of color are not to be trusted. Dusenbery gets into the actual published science behind all the bad science and medicine and how the tides are slowly beginning to turn. Very slowly – even when new science is presented, meant to effect practice changes, no one is there making sure every physician or care provider incorporates new findings into their daily practice.

Doing Harm is one of a three-book trifecta coming out March 6 about women’s health and chronic illness. I will review Invisible on March 6. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to acquire a galley of Ask Me About My Uterus so will have to wait until it arrives at the store to check it out.

Dear FTC: I read a digital galley of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss.

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One thought on “Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick by Maya Dusenbery

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